Tag Archives: Joseph Wrobel

Are short sales worth the risks and is bankruptcy a better option?

 

When bad things happen to good people homes may fall into foreclosure. In too many cases, houses are not worth what the owner owes on the mortgage. This is common with people who bought their homes before the recession when prices were high. If the lender forecloses on the house it will be sold to the highest auction bidder. If the house sells for less than is owed, there may be an opportunity for the lender to sue and collect the deficiency judgment, or balance due after foreclosure. If the market is flooded with foreclosure homes, they could be sold off for significantly less than they would be worth in a healthier economy and real estate market. As foreclosure sales created more financial damage to many, the alternative method of short sales became more popular, giving homeowners an easier way out of their mortgages.

While short sales allow is a sale of your home to a new homebuyer for less money than you owe on your mortgage. If the lender bank agrees to a short sale deal, you may sell the house and be released from the mortgage lien and may go on your way to rent or purchase a more affordable home. While this sounds like a dream come true, there may be a few catches.

Here is a short list of considerations when you have the option to short sell your home:

  1. The lender bank and decision maker on your mortgage has no duty to accept a short sale deal. When you owe the money, you owe the money, plain and simple. The bank may be motivated to do a short sale if the market is flooded with upside down deals and the home is likely to sell under value at auction. Instead of fighting to then also collect the deficiency judgment against you, a lender may be more likely to work with you on a short sale deal, to get the house sold for fair market value.
  2. Even if the bank allows the short sale deal, they may not operate at the speed of business and it may be easier to lose buyers who cannot wait for a slow-moving lender bank. If the lender has a large volume of short sale deals, it may be even more difficult to get things done in a timely manner. Losing buyers and increased aggravation are possible in many short sale deals.
  3. Deficiencies are also possible with short sale deals. Even if you get more money for your house in a short sale, the amount you owe may still leave you short. It is a good idea to have a financial advisor assist you with your options to see what makes the most sense. If the short sale is still going to leave you high and dry, it may be better to proceed with a simpler foreclosure.

Short sales are long and complicated. There are more people involved in the transaction, more tax implications, more chances for something to go wrong. The more complicated the process, the easier it is for people to get frustrated and walk away from a deal.

Why would bankruptcy be a better option?

Depending on a review of your financial situation, a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy may help you keep your home and avoid foreclosure. If you know you are badly upside down on your home and want to get out of your mortgage regardless, a bankruptcy can help you wipe out the amount of the deficiency judgment and give you a fresh start.

Depending on what you owe, how much you own and your income, a Chapter 7 full discharge will stop your bill collectors and wipe out all your dischargeable debts. If you do not qualify for a Chapter 7, a Chapter 13 reorganization bankruptcy will allow you to pay back a fraction of your debts over a three to five-year period, which may help you stay in your home and avoid making the foreclosure versus short sale decision.

About us: Joseph Wrobel, Ltd., works with clients to find out if they qualify for Chapter 7 or 13 bankruptcy, and their options and rights under the law. The firm will also advise and assist clients with questions and concerns about the collectors and their rights to pursue you.

Joseph Wrobel, Ltd. helps people get control of their finances and a fresh start at financial freedom. The firm’s website contains informative videos about financial issues as well as bankruptcy protection for families who want a fresh start.

Don’t forget to keep up with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Avvo, where you can read client and peer reviews!

 

How well do you know reverse mortgages?

By now, anyone who watches TV has likely seen advertisements for reverse mortgages. Targeted towards senior citizens who own their homes free and clear. Ads highlight that the Federal Housing Authority (FHA) insures over 98 percent of all the reverse mortgages in United States. A reverse mortgage loan allows a home owner, at least 62 years of age, to convert the equity in their home into cash. Some people take monthly payments, lines of credit as well as lump sums of cash as needed. The loan against the equity in the home is secured by the home itself.

When the owner passes away the loan becomes due in full and is often taken from the proceeds of the sale of the home. In other cases, a life insurance policy may be used to repay the loan if home and other property is given to others in a will. The lenders offering reverse mortgages charge fees and surcharges along the way. These fees and the terms of the loan are a function of the life expectancy of the home owner, the value of the home and other factors.

Doing your research is important. The more you can learn about the pros and cons of reverse mortgages, the better decisions you and your family can make.

As the reverse mortgage ads suggest, the children of aging parents can be involved in the process of researching reverse mortgage loans and the lenders. Even if your parents are well-able to manage their financial affairs, it is always helpful to get another opinion, especially when there are so many new financial opportunities for seniors budgeting for and funding their retirement years. While researching, pay attention to credible alerts and warnings published online. Be careful because in the sea of information there is plenty of what looks like news but is really advertising telling you that reverse mortgages are risk free and there is never a need to look any further.

The loans are only as good as the lenders. Homeowners considering reverse mortgages should be notified by their lender that while the reverse mortgage is in place, the homeowner must still pay taxes and insurance on the property and that is not something covered by the lender. Lenders may also charge high fees on loans and get away with it when working with seniors who may have less bargaining power in negotiating the terms of the loan. It is important to know what financial terms are reasonable in the current time and market. Knowing what the competition is offering makes it easier to negotiate a fair reverse mortgage loan.

Beware of what you are risking with reverse mortgage loans and be vigilant. If you must, hire a professional to help you negotiate a better deal and avoid the awful stories told by several loan victims.

Read these stories at Center for American Progress: Treasury Secretary Nominee Steve Mnuchin’s Bet Against Seniors:

  • Only press coverage stopped the eviction of a 103-year-old grandmother on a technicality
  • 92-year-old widow evicted for 27-cent shortfall
  • Foreclosure actions that defy common sense

At Joseph Wrobel, Ltd., we help get our clients a fresh start at financial success. We feel strongly that everyone should be financially successful when they have the right tools and knowledge to make the best deals that protect their savings and help grow for the future.

About us: Joseph Wrobel, Ltd., works with clients to find out if they qualify for Chapter 7 or 13 bankruptcy, and their options and rights under the law. The firm will also advise and assist clients with questions and concerns about the collectors and their rights to pursue you.

Joseph Wrobel, Ltd. helps people get control of their finances and a fresh start at financial freedom. The firm’s website contains informative videos about financial issues as well as bankruptcy protection for families who want a fresh start.

Don’t forget to keep up with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Avvo, where you can read client and peer reviews!

 

Can my college transcripts really be withheld if I owe the school money?

At various times in life we may be asked to produce our college transcripts for a new job or an application to a program or further education. This issue arose in a question covered in the Chicago Bankruptcy Update podcast series where real questions are asked and answered by Chicago bankruptcy attorney, Joseph Wrobel. The individual seeking guidance needed a copy of their college transcript and the school refused their request, stating that an outstanding amount of $3,000 was still owing for tuition.

In this case the individual seeking their college transcripts filed a Chapter 7 bankruptcy and received a discharge. The short answer to the question as to whether the school may withhold the transcripts is a function of the automatic stay provision in the Bankruptcy Code.

When you file for bankruptcy, the automatic stay provisions protect you from collection activity.

The automatic stay takes effect when the petition for bankruptcy is filed with the bankruptcy court. The automatic stay provision prohibits creditors from engaging in collection activity while a bankruptcy case is active and until the case is over. While Chapter 7 discharge cases can be completed in a matter of months, a Chapter 13 reorganization case, involving payments to the trustee to catch up on debts, can be structured with three to five years of scheduled payments, thus the automatic stay is effective for a longer period of time.

The school’s refusal to tender the college transcripts is a collection activity. If the student does not pay the outstanding tuition, the school may refuse to offer the transcript. If, however, the request for the transcripts is made during a period when the automatic stay is active, the school is prohibited from collection activities and would be required to turn over the transcript.

You may be able to obtain a discharge of your duty to pay a debt, but the creditor may still want payment and in this case, can continue withholding the transcript, even after bankruptcy.

As soon as the bankruptcy case were to end and the automatic stay naturally terminates, the school could resume the position that they will not tender the transcripts until payment is made. Understand that the bankruptcy discharge may have the effect of terminating the school’s legal right to collect the debt, the debt still exists insofar as the school may still want the debt repaid before they tender the transcript.

A word to the wise: it is a good idea to keep copies of academic transcripts just in case a situation like this were to happen to you. While most people never plan to file for bankruptcy protection, financial emergencies and other bad things can happen to good people.

Joseph Wrobel, Ltd., works with clients to find out if they qualify for Chapter 7 or 13 bankruptcy, and their options and rights under the law. The firm will also advise and assist clients with questions and concerns about the collectors and their rights to pursue you.

Joseph Wrobel, Ltd. helps people get control of their finances and a fresh start at financial freedom. The firm’s website contains informative videos about financial issues as well as bankruptcy protection for families who want a fresh start.

Don’t forget to keep up with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Avvo, where you can read client and peer reviews!

 

July 2016 Chicago Bankruptcy Question and Answer Podcast with Joseph Wrobel

Chicago bankruptcy and consumer credit attorney Joseph Wrobel shares news and updates in bankruptcy law as well as business and consumer financial matters. It has been documented that financial troubles can cause all sorts of ailments, the most common of which is sleeplessness. Joseph Wrobel helps clients alleviate their anxiety created by the inability to pay bills and the embarrassment of financial distress. CLICK/TAP HERE TO LISTEN NOW!

Sample questions answered in this 30-minute show:

  • Must all my debts be included in my bankruptcy filing?
  • What are some of the dangers of filing bankruptcy without an attorney?
  • Ex-husband filed for bankruptcy, am I stuck with the debt?
  • How can I keep my house if I file for bankruptcy protection?
  • I am newly married, can I file for bankruptcy and not include my wife?

Joseph Wrobel has been a practicing attorney since 1973 and has experience in a wide variety of law relating to legal matters for individuals and families. Wrobel helps clients get out of debt and get a fresh start. He is an active member in several bar associations and the Bankruptcy Panel of Pro Bono Program of the Chicago Volunteer Legal Services. After serving the U.S. Army Reserve 363rd Civil Affairs Unit, Wrobel earned a B.A. in Psychology from Northwestern University and in 1973, he earned a JD from DePaul University Law School.

Don’t forget to keep up with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Avvo, where you can read client and peer reviews!

Visit our Chicago Bankruptcy website online for more about the firm or call for more information at (312) 781-0996 or e-mail at JosephWrobel@ChicagoBankruptcy.com.

Taking the sting out of bankruptcy: You may be surprised how liberating it can be

There are many people who consider filing for bankruptcy for a while before they finally decide it is time to go ahead. Some of the common fears people have is that everyone will find out about the bankruptcy and shun them or talk behind their back. In all likelihood, the people you think may be doing so well may also be considering a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13. It is important to remember that a bankruptcy does not mean failure – a bankruptcy means you are smart enough to take advantage of the law to protect you and give you a fresh start. People may be hesitant to file for bankruptcy because a friend told them incorrect information about the trustee coming to take and sell everything they own; this is a false myth. Credit scores are another concern many have, and they fear they will never get credit again, when in reality many lenders may look more favorably on you after you no longer are buried under a mountain of debt. While it is not the most common topic of conversation, many will tell you the relief they experienced after they filed for bankruptcy and got the mountain of debt and creditors off their back.

People are not likely to find out about your bankruptcy unless you tell them.

In years past, there may have been a more negative stigma to bankruptcy and small town newspapers published names and cases, possibly for the benefit of any creditors and providing them notice. In reality today, there are so many bankruptcy filings, especially in major cities like Chicago, that the newspaper would be massive if bankruptcy filings were posted. Unless you decide to tell people, your friends and neighbors will never know you filed for bankruptcy protection. There is a federal bankruptcy website where you can look up your own bankruptcy information and it will appear on your credit report and on background checks. Do now worry however, as more people have bankruptcies than you may realize and they still find new jobs, buy homes and cars.

It is not an immoral or unethical decision to take advantage of financial laws like bankruptcy.

Say you are sued by a creditor and they obtain a court judgement against you for $50,000. Yes, you can list that money judgment in your bankruptcy and wave goodbye to paying that off. For many people, the threat of a judgment being collected by wage garnishments and asset seizures is enough for people to decide to file for bankruptcy. Some people worry that the judge or court may be mad at you, but that is of no concern. A money judgment is just a court order to pay someone. The obligation to pay a debt can be discharged in bankruptcy – the whole point is to eliminate debts you cannot afford to pay so you can have a fresh financial start.

You can keep your car, house and belongings despite filing for bankruptcy.

There is a qualifying financial test called the Means Test and a bankruptcy lawyer can review your financials and advise you whether you qualify for a Chapter 7 discharge, the traditional bankruptcy most of us think about, or a Chapter 13 reorganization, in which you can make payments to catch up on your debts over a three to five-year period. If your vehicle is financed, you can sign a reaffirmation agreement and keep making payments despite the bankruptcy. You are allowed to keep a certain amount of equity in your home and personal belongings and assets up to a certain exemption value, despite filing for bankruptcy.

One of the best things about a bankruptcy filing is that by law, the automatic stay provision of the bankruptcy laws kicks in when you file your petition for bankruptcy – creditors and collectors must stop all collection activity and they can no longer call you while you are in bankruptcy. The stress relief of the automatic stay provision alone may bring you to a major sigh of relief.

Joseph Wrobel, Ltd., works with clients to find out if they qualify for Chapter 7 or 13 bankruptcy, and their options and rights under the law. The firm will also advise and assist clients with best credit repair options.      

Joseph Wrobel, Ltd. helps people get control of their finances and a fresh start at financial freedom. The firm’s website contains informative videos about financial issues as well as bankruptcy protection for families who want a fresh start.

Don’t forget to keep up with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Avvo, where you can read client and peer reviews!

 

 

 

Don’t believe the hype: Get the real truth about bankruptcy, ignore the rumors

Among the options for researching and gathering information about bankruptcy, there are some wrong sources of information. Asking your mother, neighbor, or someone in line at the grocery store about bankruptcy law is not a good idea for several reasons. First, the bankruptcy laws change over time and what could have been true at one point could be different later. Second, every individual’s financial circumstances are unique; what conditions of bankruptcy apply to one, may not apply to another. Third, there are so many variables in bankruptcy law that anyone who is not an experienced bankruptcy lawyer could overlook significant details that could seriously affect the outcome of a bankruptcy filing, when someone attempts for file for bankruptcy on their own and without a lawyer. Experienced bankruptcy lawyers hear most if not all of the myths or “old wives’ tales” about divorce. The following is this week’s top 5 list of dispelled bankruptcy myths.

Joseph Wrobel, Ltd. Top 5 Bankruptcy Myths: Setting the Record Straight:

  1. Your financial future will forever be ruined and you’ll never be able to finance anything again.

Wrong! Many people are able to obtain credit cards, home and auto loans within a few years of a bankruptcy filing. Lenders look at your ability to make payments. If you owe everyone under the sun the chances are higher that you may default on your obligations. If however, you went through a bankruptcy and were able to reorganize or wipe out your regularly serviced debts, you may have more money to pay bills, which makes you a better candidate to be given credit to finance house hold items, cars and homes.

  1. The bankruptcy trustee is going to come to your house and take everything and the kitchen sink.

Wrong again! Every state has exemption laws that allow you to keep a certain amount of personal property, vehicles and even equity in your home. In Illinois, for example, you may keep money you receive in child support or alimony. You may also keep any money ordered to you in restitution for being a crime victim. Home equity may also be kept, up to $15,000, so if you owe more than your home is worth or do not have more than $15,000 you may be able to keep your home. Of course there are differences between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy filings, but in many cases people are able to keep their cars, homes and personal property, up to a certain dollar value. So you will not have to run out and beg on the streets for shirts and pants because you file for bankruptcy.

  1. You will be better off if you suck it up and pay off the debts you owe; until the day you die.

Nope, incorrect. The financial emergencies, whether sudden or developing slowly over a period of time, could put you so far behind the starting line that you will never be able to get ahead. Imagine you earn $50,000 a year and have a debt from a lawsuit judgement or medical emergency and owe $500,000 or more. You could make minimum payments of $1,000 for the rest of your life and never pay off more than a small fraction of that debt. This is exactly why we have insurance and bankruptcy laws. Even if your debt is $50-100,000, your ability to save for retirement may be greatly diminished or extinguished by outstanding debt. Taking advantage of the bankruptcy laws can give you a fresh start.

  1. Bankruptcy will wipe away all your debts including taxes, student loans and court obligations.

Don’t believe the hype. While Chapter 7 may help you eliminate most debts, assuming you qualify financially, Chapter 13 bankruptcy may be your better or only option to reorganize your debt and get caught up on a monthly payment plan for several years. First, forget about discharging your student loan debt. It is virtually impossible to prove the hardship necessary as a matter of law, and on the bright side, even if they garnish your wages, they can only take a certain limited amount and not the majority of your paycheck. Child support and certain court orders in family law are non-dischargeable, as opposed to civil money judgments which may be eliminated in bankruptcy. Taxes, utilities and other debts may or may not be dischargeable depending on their age and whether they meet certain conditions, which an experienced bankruptcy lawyer can explain.

  1. If you file for bankruptcy, you have to admit you are a failure and are personally flawed.

Do not be silly. Just about any situation can occur, such as a car accident rendering you incapacitated for six months or more; that would wipe almost anyone out financially. If you cannot work to pay your bills and spend down your savings you may have a bankruptcy in your future. Face it, bad things happen to good people, and that is another reason the bankruptcy laws exist, to help us with a fresh start when we need it the most. Furthermore, do not feel that you are going to be in big trouble with the court if you discharge a money judgement against you in bankruptcy. The bankruptcy laws are bigger than the court order to pay off a money judgement against you in most civil cases.

This list is hardly a complete account of all the misinformation and misunderstandings about State and Federal bankruptcy laws, and if you have any questions, even if you think they are “dumb” questions, do not hesitate to reach out and ask us. We’ll set you on the better track.  

Joseph Wrobel, Ltd., works with clients to find out if they qualify for Chapter 7 or 13 bankruptcy, and their options and rights under the law. The firm will also advise and assist clients with best credit repair options.      

Joseph Wrobel, Ltd. helps people get control of their finances and a fresh start at financial freedom. The firm’s website contains informative videos about financial issues as well as bankruptcy protection for families who want a fresh start.

Don’t forget to keep up with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Avvo, where you can read client and peer reviews!

 

Memorial Day 2016 Chicago Bankruptcy Question and Answer Podcast with Joseph Wrobel

Chicago bankruptcy and consumer credit attorney Joseph Wrobel shares news and updates in bankruptcy law as well as business and consumer financial matters. It has been documented that financial troubles can cause all sorts of ailments, the most common of which is sleeplessness. Joseph Wrobel helps clients alleviate their anxiety created by the inability to pay bills and the embarrassment of financial distress.

Click/tap here to listen to the podcast

Sample questions answered in this 30-minute show:

  • Can I convert from a Chapter 7 to a Chapter 13 bankruptcy if I made the wrong filing?
  • Is there a way to stop a garnishment and get a payment plan without filing bankruptcy?
  • Will the bankruptcy trustee sell my house in order to pay off any of my debts?
  • How can I file for Chapter 7 with damaged credit and little or no student income?

Joseph Wrobel has been a practicing attorney since 1973 and has experience in a wide variety of law relating to legal matters for individuals and families. Wrobel helps clients get out of debt and get a fresh start. He is an active member in several bar associations and the Bankruptcy Panel of Pro Bono Program of the Chicago Volunteer Legal Services. After serving the U.S. Army Reserve 363rd Civil Affairs Unit, Wrobel earned a B.A. in Psychology from Northwestern University and in 1973, he earned a JD from DePaul University Law School.

Don’t forget to keep up with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Avvo, where you can read client and peer reviews!

Visit our Chicago Bankruptcy website online for more about the firm or call for more information at (312) 781-0996 or e-mail at JosephWrobel@ChicagoBankruptcy.com.

Debt settlement pitfalls and issues, get it in writing

When deals look too good to be true, they probably are. Credit card companies and bill collectors may reach out and offer settlement “deals” to customers who owe them money. Unfortunately, many dishonest bill collectors out there make deals with customers and then completely fail to honor those agreements once the money is paid. With some collection agencies, the customer must be late in their payments to qualify for a partial settlement. If you qualify for a settlement with a partial payment, and you make an agreement over the phone, enforcing that agreement can be difficult. There may also be income tax consequences and liabilities for settling debts for less than you owe, and in many instances, the creditors do not tell people about tax consequences.

Creditors may offer partial settlements when they are otherwise ready to file a lawsuit against you.

The companies who own the consumer debt you owe, on a credit card, for example, have a limitation of five years to file a lawsuit in court to seek a judgment against you. Having said that, they can continue with debt collection forever if they do not obtain a court judgment. If the debt has been unpaid for years, and it is getting close to the time when the collector has the option to file a lawsuit against you, they may reach out and offer a settlement of the debt you owe, sometimes taking 50 to 70 percent off the entire balance, if you pay in full. At the time, if the creditor is threatening a lawsuit they are doing so because they think you will pay the settlement amount to avoid a trip to court and a judgment entered against you.

Make sure to get the deal in writing.

The deals many creditors offer requires the partial payment to satisfy the debt be paid in one lump sum. Others may accept payments over a short time, but the overall deal will not be as good. It is very important, if you make a deal with the creditor, to pay a partial amount in settlement of the entire debt, that you get an agreement in writing. Too often, the deals are made over the phone and once the creditor receives your partial payment, they sue you anyways or continue trying to collect from you, even when you thought you had an agreement.

There are credit score and potential tax consequences of settling a debt.

The policy of some credit companies is to offer settlements once debts have become delinquent, either 60 days or longer. If you have a high credit card balance and interest and you have been paying on time, your credit score might have to suffer late payment marks before you may be eligible to participate in a deal to settle your debt for a partial payment. Likewise, with the necessity to get the agreement in writing, make sure the agreement states that the creditor will promptly notify all the credit agencies.

The IRS considers a debt owed, that is written off, to be income. Income from a settlement that exceeds $600 must be reported when you file your taxes. Most creditors in the business of collecting and settling debts will send you an IRS Form 1099-C to file with your taxes, reflecting the write off amount as taxable income. It is important to keep track of tax liability for settled debts, to protect yourself in the event the creditor never sends you a form, or sends a form to the IRS but not to you.

Bankruptcy can be an alternative to court judgments and collection agreements.

While some bill collectors will work with customers and give them written agreements with fair terms, many others take what they can get and run, or sue you anyways. If you do get sued for a debt collection and the company is threatening to take your property, wages, tax returns or more, a Chapter 7 or 13 bankruptcy filing can stop them in their tracks. As soon as bankruptcy petition is received by the bankruptcy court, the automatic stay provision takes effect, making it a federal crime for a collector to continue pursuing collection efforts against you while you are in bankruptcy. You may be eligible for a Chapter 7 full discharge, or a Chapter 13 structured reorganization plan, paying debts back over time, often pennies on the dollar.

Joseph Wrobel, Ltd., works with clients on consumer issues including bankruptcy and they can offer additional information to find out if you qualify for Chapter 7 or 13 bankruptcy, and your options and rights under the law.

Joseph Wrobel, Ltd. helps people get control of their finances and a fresh start at financial freedom. The firm’s website contains informative videos about financial issues as well as bankruptcy protection for families who want a fresh start.

Don’t forget to keep up with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Avvo, where you can read client and peer reviews!

 

Beware of credit repair scams

Credit repair scams are unfortunately common and it is important to do your homework and research a company who makes claims they can repair and rebuild your credit score and reputation. Many people worry that filing for bankruptcy and taking advantage of the laws to help get a fresh financial start will cripple their credit forever. In many cases, bankruptcy filers are pleasantly surprised how easy it is to get a loan for a home or car, or get a new credit card within a number of months after a bankruptcy. When you have fewer active debt and collection liabilities, you are likely better able to pay your bills and be approved for credit. You might pay a higher interest rate on a loan, but the amount of debt discharged in a Chapter 7 or 13 bankruptcy makes the trade off worthwhile.

The Federal Trade Commission offers free information to help consumers spot and report credit repair scams. You’ll know you’re encountering credit repair fraud if a company:

  • insists you pay them before they do any work on your behalf
  • tells you not to contact the credit reporting companies directly
  • tells you to dispute information in your credit report — even if you know it’s accurate
  • tells you to give false information on your applications for credit or a loan
  • doesn’t explain your legal rights when they tell you what they can do for you

Examples of recent credit scams and alerts to consumers to beware:

A court responded to the Federal Trade Commission request to stop the operations of First Time Credit Solutions, a credit repair company allegedly posing as an affiliate of the FTC when marketing to Spanish-speaking consumers. The complaint alleges marketing as “FTC Credit Solutions” and used a false affiliation with the federal agency to sell fraudulent credit repair services. The company guaranteed a 700 or higher credit score to its customers within six months or less.[i]

In another credit repair scam, a Florida company was fined $7.4 million by the FTC and ignored court orders to cease and desist from selling their illegal credit repair system. The owners of the company operated under several names: BFS Empowerment Financial Services, Inc., Help My Credit Now Credit Services, Inc., and Kevtrese Enterprises, Inc. These companies claimed they could permanently remove negative information on credit reports, even when the negative information was actually true and correct.

Joseph Wrobel, Ltd., can refer clients to reputable credit repair companies that do not make outrageous claims and make false or illegal promises.

A general rule applies to credit repair as it does in any business, if it seems too good to be true, it probably is. We have relationships with reputable credit repair companies who are especially helpful when you may have lingering negative information on your credit report about debts that were discharged in bankruptcy.

Joseph Wrobel, Ltd. helps people get control of their finances and a fresh start at financial freedom. The firm’s website contains informative videos about financial issues as well as bankruptcy protection for families who want a fresh start.

Don’t forget to keep up with us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Avvo, where you can read client and peer reviews!

 

[i] New America Media, Court Shuts Down Credit Repair “Scam” that Targeted Latinos, by George White, Apr. 114,2015.

New Years Chicago Bankruptcy Question and Answer Podcast with Joseph Wrobel

Chicago bankruptcy and consumer credit attorney Joseph Wrobel shares news and updates in bankruptcy law as well as business and consumer financial matters. It has been documented that financial troubles can cause all sorts of ailments, the most common of which is sleeplessness. Joseph Wrobel helps clients alleviate their anxiety created by the inability to pay bills and the embarrassment of financial distress. Click Here to Listen to the Podcast!

Sample questions answered in this 30-minute show:

  • What happens to when you are renting and file for bankruptcy?
  • What is a 341 bankruptcy meeting and when does it take place?
  • How will a spouse be affected when the other spouse files for bankruptcy?
  • Does my spouse’s income have anything to do with qualifying for a bankruptcy?

Joseph Wrobel has been a practicing attorney since 1973 and has experience in a wide variety of law relating to legal matters for individuals and families. Wrobel helps clients get out of debt and get a fresh start. He is an active member in several bar associations and the Bankruptcy Panel of Pro Bono Program of the Chicago Volunteer Legal Services. After serving the U.S. Army Reserve 363rd Civil Affairs Unit, Wrobel earned a B.A. in Psychology from Northwestern University and in 1973, he earned a JD from DePaul University Law School.

Don’t forget to keep up with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Avvo, where you can read client and peer reviews!

Visit our Chicago Bankruptcy website online for more about the firm or call for more information at (312) 781-0996 or e-mail at JosephWrobel@ChicagoBankruptcy.com.